Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Trying to figure out the best setup for my nas/htpc
#1
Hello!  I'm just trying to figure out the best setup for my Nas/HTPC. I currently have a HTPC running Windows 7. It's an old i3 Sandybridge setup with 3 2tb hdd. I have 2 of those mirrored that contain pictures, videos, my music collection and the rest of the space is filled with my movie collection. I currently have everything backed up, except my movie collection. I was thinking of turning it into a Nas/HTPC with a raid 5 setup for redundancy. I was wondering which os I should use, Ubuntu server, Amahi, OMV, freenas or something else.  I want to setup sabnzbd, sickbeard, Plex server, and Kodi on this machine.  Also, I would like to use it to back up pictures and videos from 2 iphones.  I was just going to add more HDD for more space but on windows 7 I cant do raid 5.  At this point Im thinking if I should just upgrade the whole system or not.  I need something that will be low maintenance and not too difficult to learn as I have never used any linux os before.  I have looked at a few of your articles and I like how detailed they are.  Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Reply
#2
(03-25-2016, 12:53 AM)Redeye Wrote: Hello!  I'm just trying to figure out the best setup for my Nas/HTPC. I currently have a HTPC running Windows 7. It's an old i3 Sandybridge setup with 3 2tb hdd. I have 2 of those mirrored that contain pictures, videos, my music collection and the rest of the space is filled with my movie collection. I currently have everything backed up, except my movie collection. I was thinking of turning it into a Nas/HTPC with a raid 5 setup for redundancy. I was wondering which os I should use, Ubuntu server, Amahi, OMV, freenas or something else.  I want to setup sabnzbd, sickbeard, Plex server, and Kodi on this machine.  Also, I would like to use it to back up pictures and videos from 2 iphones.  I was just going to add more HDD for more space but on windows 7 I cant do raid 5.  At this point Im thinking if I should just upgrade the whole system or not.  I need something that will be low maintenance and not too difficult to learn as I have never used any linux os before.  I have looked at a few of your articles and I like how detailed they are.  Any help will be greatly appreciated.

I don't think there's a cheap option for what you want to do.

Here's how I do it: 

Move off your old PC and just use your NAS for holding all your stuff. Set it up in RAID 1 so that you don't lose anything - upgrade the size of the drives so that you can put your movies on there too. You can get pretty good two-drive NAS units these days for under $200 - and don't forget - you can use multiple NAS drives on the same network, and even "daisy chain" them up so that a HTPC is tricked into thinking it is a single source.

Then you can set up all your TVs/monitors to stream off your NAS using a number of devices: Android TV boxes (the octo-cores are out now), Raspberry Pi, full blown PCs/laptops running VLC, set-top boxes (AppleTV, since you mentioned using iPhones), etc., etc.

If cost is an issue, you can't go wrong with Raspberry Pi. The new 1.2 GHz boards are out now, and with a modest heat sink and/or a 40mm fan, you can get a RP3 board with SD card for about $50 each. If you get the NOOBs SD Card, you can simply hold the shift button down when booting up and play around with SEVEN different Linux distros - some of them are merely Kodi-only, others are full-fledged desktop Linux distros. Granted, they're not as robust as Fedora or Ubuntu or whatever, but they are useful. Also, the RP3 is so small and light you can even hook it up and leave it hanging by the HDMI cable if you want (and there are VESA mounting kits available if you want to mount it to the back of a TV that is not hanging on a wall already). My TV is pretty basic (a 5 year old Vizio), and it has CEC capability with the remote control, and it picked up my Raspberry Pi board and works with Kodi without a problem.

For your iPhone syncing: personally, I use Synology NAS products, and it seamlessly and automatically syncs everything I do on two cell phones to my NAS without me even doing anything. I also use DropBox for "cloud backup" purposes, and have that synced up to the NAS as well. Lon Seidman has a superb YouTube video showing how it all works with DS CloudSync. Once you buy a Synology NAS, all the utilities that Synology offers are absolutely free for life. FreeNAS is a tweaker's wet dream, but they're pricey and require a bit more finagling than I like, though their processing power and memory is certainly superior.

I'm not helpful if you need "live" torrent streaming, though I've read reviews saying the new Android set-top boxes can do it.

All of this changes if you're thinking of going 4K UHD - much more difficult and expensive to suit your needs. I'm not an expert there (I only have a 42" TV, so 4K wouldn't make a difference), but I'm sure others are.
Reply
#3
I already bought 4 4tb hdd. Just trying to figure out which OS I should go with that's easy for a beginner in Linux. If my hardware is too out dated, I might as well upgrade to a new skylake setup when I start fresh with a new os .
Reply
#4
(03-27-2016, 11:22 PM)Redeye Wrote: I already bought 4 4tb hdd. Just trying to figure out which OS I should go with that's easy for a beginner in Linux. If my hardware is too out dated, I might as well upgrade to a new skylake setup when I start fresh with a new os .

Ah, if you're bent on Linux, and rather new at this, I don't think you can go wrong with Ubuntu or Fedora distros. They will make old hardware run like new - no joke. I actually have Ubuntu on an old dual-core laptop at home that is 10 years old and it still boots in under 20 seconds, and has never batted an eye at anything I've ever thrown at it. Granted, I'm mostly doing spreadsheet stuff with OpenOffice in it, but still, putting Linux on old hardware significantly prolongs the life of your stuff.

As far as getting it to integrate with a NAS, it shouldn't be a problem. There are a lot of add-ons out there to make great home networks that are available in the package center.

Personally I think if you go full-on Linux for all your stuff (PCs, network), then you'll be able to stretch the life of your hardware another generation or two. Going Skylake is still pretty expensive.
Reply


Forum Jump: